Executive Speaking Weblog

Communication – the future of business

A Lesson in Presenting From Law & Order

Posted by Presentation Skills on February 15, 2011

http://www.executivespeaking.com.au/freevideos.

Presentation skills. Great presentation skills will advance your career quicker than any other skill. You will be seen as the leader who needs to be listened too.

Take a lesson from Law & Order and start your presentation straight away. There is not need to thank your audience for letting you speak (Most had no choice in the matter!) Just get straight into what you wanted to say and you will haev the audience engaged and listening to you.

Get to your point straight away and your audience will thank you for it.

Cheers

Darren Fleming

Australia’s Corproate Speech Coach

Posted in Executive Speaking Skills, Executive Speaking Video, presentation skills, Presentation skills training, Presentation skills training Adelaide, Presentation skills training Brisbane, Presentation skills training Melbourne, Presentation skills training Sydney, public speaking, public speaking tips, Toastmasters | Tagged: , | 2 Comments »

Lies, Dam Lies and Statistics

Posted by Presentation Skills on January 30, 2011

Lies, Dam lies and Statistics

How to make statistics interesting…..

Cheers

Darren Fleming – Australia’s Corporate Speech Coach

http://www.executivespeaking.com.au

Posted in Executive Speaking Skills, Executive Speaking Video, Language of Leadership, presentation skills, Presentation skills training, Presentation skills training Adelaide, Presentation skills training Brisbane, Presentation skills training Melbourne, Presentation skills training Sydney, public speaking, public speaking courses, public speaking humour, public speaking tips, Sales Presentations | Tagged: , , , | 1 Comment »

Jokes and Presentations – Don’t do it!

Posted by Presentation Skills on January 7, 2011

Real Leaders know how to uncover the humour in their message to make their audience laugh.

When speaking to any audience, it is important to build a rapport with them as quickly as possible—and humour can be a great way to make this connection. However, it’s often best to leave the punch-line jokes aside and focus on more subtle types of humour.

It’s a misconception that beginning a presentation with a joke will get the audience on your side. In fact, jokes will fail far more often than they will succeed. There are several reasons for this unfortunate outcome:
• The funniest jokes are usually not appropriate for the work environment.
• Most jokes rely on a victim—and chances are that someone will identify more with the victim than with you. If the audience identifies with you more than the victim they will find the joke funny.  However, there will be people in the audience who identify with the victim and will think your joke is in poor taste.  If there are too many of these people in the audience, the joke will fail.
• Jokes require exact wording, good delivery, and perfect timing.  If you don’t carry off all three of these things, your joke will fall flat and leave you struggling.
• If you are constantly opening with jokes, you will get a reputation for it. You would be better off building a reputation as someone who has something important to say than as someone who cracks jokes.
• If you do happen to find the right joke and deliver it properly and everyone thinks it’s funny, they will probably remember the joke more than what you had to say.  If your joke overshadows your content, it will  prevent you from delivering your message.

Although structured jokes with punch lines are almost always a poor choice for your a presentations, humour is an important aspect of all public speaking presentations.

One type of humour that works well when applied to speeches is situational humour. Situational humour can involve making observations on what is going on around you at that moment. Chances are good that if you find something in your immediate environment is funny, others will too. Situational humour can also be used in the stories that you tell.

Another type of humour that works well in a speech or presentation is self-deprecating humour. In this case, you are the only victim of the joke and no one else is hurt or offended. More than that, self-deprecation shows the audience that you are not taking yourself too seriously and helps them build a fondness and respect for you.

Remember: even though humour can be a useful and fun tool to utilise, it is not required to successfully communicate with your audience. If you know that you are lacking a sense of humour, don’t try and force humour into your presentations—focus on your strengths instead. If you are unsure of whether or not a line is funny, try dropping it into a casual conversation and gauge the reactions—even if it doesn’t meet with laughter, it’s a better option than having a bit of humour flop in the midst of a speech.

Posted in Executive Speaking Skills, Executive Speaking Video, humour in presentations, Politics and speaking, presentation skills, Presentation skills training, Presentation skills training Adelaide, Presentation skills training Brisbane, Presentation skills training Melbourne, Presentation skills training Sydney, public speaking, public speaking courses, public speaking humour | Tagged: , , | 3 Comments »

Presentation Skills Melbourne

Posted by Presentation Skills on January 2, 2011

Visit Presentation Skills Melbourne for more information.

Posted in Executive Speaking Skills, Executive Speaking Video, PowerPoint, presentation skills, Presentation skills training, Presentation skills training Adelaide, Presentation skills training Brisbane, Presentation skills training Melbourne, Presentation skills training Sydney, public speaking | Leave a Comment »

The One Presentation Skills Secret to Easier Presentations

Posted by Presentation Skills on January 1, 2011

Posted in Executive Speaking Skills, Executive Speaking Video, presentation skills, Presentation skills training, Presentation skills training Adelaide, Presentation skills training Brisbane, Presentation skills training Melbourne, Presentation skills training Sydney, public speaking, public speaking tips | Leave a Comment »

Posted by Presentation Skills on October 28, 2010

Many speakers will share a quote in a presentation to add power to their message. Here is how to use them for greatest impact.

  • Use them as supporting evidence. Deliver your point and explain it, then drop the quote in. It’s better to show that you have an idea that Obama supports with a quote, rather than having an idea of Obama’s that you have pinched and tried to expand. 
  • Know the quote verbatim. No reading it out, no putting it on the screen. If it is integral to your message, it stands to reason that you know it back-to-front. 
  • If you must put the quote on the screen, don’t use ‘Quotation Marks’. Quotation marks reduce the quote to a temporary message.  
  • Always attribute the quote to the correct source.  

As always your thoughts appreciated below.

Cheers

Darren Fleming – Australia’s Corporate Speech Coach

Posted in Business Presentations, Executive Speaking Skills, humour in presentations, Language of Leadership, nervousness, PowerPoint, presentation skills, public speaking, public speaking courses, public speaking tips, Sales Presentations, Understanding your audience, World Classs Business Presentations | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Persuade one-by-one

Posted by Presentation Skills on October 26, 2010

Persuade One-by-One,

When you are send your next group e-mail write it as though you are sending an individual e-mail. This will make it more personal to the reader and you will get a better response. When the recipient reads the e-mail it will sound as though you are writing directly to them – not to a group that they just happen to be part of.

Why does this work?

Compare their point of view to yours. When you write it you are in a one-to-many relationship. However, when they read it, they are in a one-to-one relationship. While they can see that you have sent the e-mail to many, they are reading it on their own and will respond as such. Make you language specific to an individual. Instead of asking, ‘Can someone assist with the training’ try, ‘Can you assist with the training.’ This puts the onus directly on the recipient to respond.

As always your thoughs below…

Cheers

Darren Fleming – Australia’s Corporate Speech Coach

Posted in Executive Speaking Skills, Language of Leadership, public speaking, public speaking tips, Toastmasters, Understanding your audience, World Classs Business Presentations | Leave a Comment »

Formal Language 2.0

Posted by Presentation Skills on September 26, 2010

Formal language has change an enourmous amount in the last 5 years. This has been driven by cutting-edge organisations that have a wide reach. Companies such as Facebook, Google and Apple are leading the way. Through their reach and their ability speed-up our life they are reducing the places where formal language is being used. This has happened in three areas: 

  • Talking as Friends. Google just released an update for Google chrome. The on-screen pop-up gave me 3 options – Install Now, Uninstall Now, and “Don’t bug me”. This is something your friend would say to you. This type of language is one way that the worlds largest and most influential companies builds familiarity with me. How are you doing this with your clients?
  • Abbrviations are becoming part of our formal language. Today, every ‘phone has an App – non of them have Applications. Jargon is not jargon when everyone uses it.
  • ‘Old School’ formal language is now being used only where you need to have an impact – Terms and Conditions, warnings and any other plce of legal speak. This contrast makes the use of formal language more pronounced.

This evolution is just another way that we try to cut through the clutter of mass communication.

How are you evolving your message to cut through?

As always, your comments appreciated.

Cheers

Darren Fleming  – Australia’s Corporate Speech Coach

Posted in public speaking | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

How to tell if people are really listening to the boss

Posted by Presentation Skills on August 2, 2010

Want to know if people are engaged in what your Boss is saying at your next team meeting? You’ll notice this after a report has taken about 3-4 minutes to deliver.
 
When your boss/colleague/whoever has finished talking observe how others MOVE. Do they start moving at the same time, shifting their weight from side-to-side, moving their whole body as though they have just woken up? If they do, there is a good chance they have just woken up – or at least come out of a trance.
 
This happens when your voice becomes monotone. When it is monotone it becomes hypnotic. In the way that a good hypnotist will relax you into a trance with their voice, you can do the same to your team if you are not careful
 
You can avoid this by varying your voice in speed, volume, tone and even just pausing……………mid sentence. It does not matter how interesting your message is, if it is delivered without energy and enthusiasm it will disengage your team.
 
Now I know that this does not happen when you speak, but it will for others at your meeting

Posted in Executive Speaking Skills, how to sound like an executive, Language of Leadership, Martketing your speaking skills, nervousness, presentation skills, public speaking, public speaking tips, Sales Presentations, Understanding your audience | 5 Comments »

More Strength to Your Arm

Posted by Presentation Skills on July 26, 2010

When you want to have more power in what you say or write, what do you do?

There are two ways people try to increase the strength of what they say or write. The first is to increase the word count. They put in a whole bunch of adjectives to give their message more weight. These include words very, exactaly, precisely, huge etc in the hope that it will give their point more weight. The better approach is to take the Zen path and reduce the word count. Cut the adjectives and excess words that do not add value. Pay particular attention to any adjectives ending in the ‘ly’. Words ending in ly weaken your sentence and reduce the strength of your message. The next time you see an e-mail with an ly word in it, re-read it without the word and see the sentence change.

As always, your thoughts appreciated here

Posted in Executive Speaking Skills, Language of Leadership, nervousness, PowerPoint, presentation skills, public speaking, public speaking courses, public speaking tips, Sales Presentations, World Classs Business Presentations | Tagged: , , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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